Priscilla Robinson

BLUE STUDIO working with indigo on handmade paper

Two ancient traditions in one!  Quite a unique experience.  Time was an interesting factor and smell was certainly part of the process.

Once I created a vat of the indigo bath, I processed just about every sheet of unsized handmade paper I had around me.  Hemp, flax, abaca, kozo and cotton.  The pieces that could withstand dipping were dunked and the others were saturated with the indigo bath on a huge brush.  There was always a distinctive urine-like smell in the room but not unpleasant.  Once the liquid indigo touched the fibers of the paper they were a bright green.  Over a period of about 10 minutes they evolved into the final blues.  This timing is shown in the photograph transpiring over a time period of about 15 minutes.  The most recent dunking pieces were the greens.  Here are a few finished pieces using the little squares.

My conclusion was that I could get some blues that I can’t get with acrylic paint but the control of specific blues was more serendipitous.

              

SUSPENDED PANELS SHIPPED TO PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

Flora And Fauna

These three panels are over 7 feet tall and will hang from the ceiling for a Senior Center lobby.  Each panel has embedded fused glass surrounded by painted handmade paper

COMMISSIONS SHIPPED TO MINNESOTA AND TENNESSEE

Finished two projects.  One is of embossed handmade paper commissioned by Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

The other is of handmade paper and fused glass for Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

            

TWO ARTWORKS IN NBC TV SERIES

Two artworks are in being used in the TV Series, Revolution.  The second season is being filmed in Austin, Texas and continues with this American post-apocalyptic science fiction television drama. NBC Wednesdays 7pm central.

Fire And Ice” is 33 x 33 inches and is made from
flax handmade paper, encaustic, glass beads, gold leaf

Heavenly Bodies” is aluminum leaf and kozo and is 28 x 28 inches

FIRST PIECE FINISHED IN AUSTIN STUDIO AFTER REMODEL

2pod floor 2

After several months of redoing lighting, walls, floors and ceilings I am finally able to work again at the studio on Hancock Drive in Austin.  This is the first piece finished in the new environment.  “Currents” was commissioned for a private residence in Houston.

The process was quite labor intensive.  The first step was to make the handmade paper of abaca,  then cutting thousands of pod shapes, painting, combining and then gluing them onto a wooden form made by  furniture designer and fabricator, David Amdur.  The zig-zag form is in 2 pieces designed to hang on the wall with French cleats.  The width of the piece is 10 feet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

    

 

 

 

 

 

BEFORE AND AFTER

Meringue 2 was delivered to Wally Workman Gallery, Austin, Texas after working on it through the summer.  This is what happened to those 400 triangles.

Finished artwork

WASHI EXHIBIT IN COLORADO

DURANGO AND DALLAS: TWO EXHIBITIONS: One is a handmade paper show, the other a glass show.

Paper/Glass are two so very different media but so similar. Both are of the earth. In both cases I am interested in flow.  Flow is created by fire or by water.  Which is the best way for the vision to come out?

WASHI AND OTHER EPHEMERA: an exhibition in Durango, Colorado
https://www.facebook.com/events/540564832671792/
I will be showing this piece in this handmade paper exhibition.  The show is at the Durango Art Center from August 23-September 28.   Opening reception is Friday, August 23 5-7 pm

KITTRELL RIFFKIND GLASS GALLERY, Dallas, Texas
I will be showing 6 pieces with glass embedded in handmade paper panels.
August 24-Sept. 21.  Opening reception is Saturday, August 24  11-5:30 pm

                      

PAPERMAKING IN NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

In Taos, the monsoons have begun and I am pulling 400 kozo triangles and then coating them with kon’nyaku ( konjac).  When I return to the Austin studio I will boil them in an alkaline bath and then apply a momogami technique to make 45 units.  Kon’nyaku has been used by the Japanese to make their washi water resistant.  For example, shoshi screens and umbrellas needed to be water resistant.  I use kon’nyaku mostly because it gives a beautiful surface to the paper.

3 days later & 400 sheets

AUTHENTIC VISUAL VOICES: CONTEMPORARY PAPER & ENCAUSTIC

Taos Studio December 2011

I am honored to be one of the 28 artists is this new video.  Catherine Nash visited my Taos studio in December 2011 and filmed my portion.  She had already finished interviewing in California and the West Coast and moved on afterwards to the rest of the U.S.

Authentic Visual Voices: Contemporary Paper and Encaustic offers a rare opportunity to gain insight into the artistic process: 28 professional artists in their own voices discuss their artwork with artist/author Catherine Nash during in-the-studio video interviews which focus on where creative inspiration comes from and how artists synthesize experience, emotions and concerns into their work.

Each of the 28 artists were asked to create a new work in front of the camera and complete it for inclusion in this computer interactive book.

www.authenticvisualvoices.com